Home Comedian of the Day Comedian of the Day (10/21/22): Jasmine Ruiz

Comedian of the Day (10/21/22): Jasmine Ruiz

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She’s a viral social media sensation during the day and one of the best young comedians on the east coast by night. As part of We Own The Laughs.com’s Comedian of the Day, have a few laughs and get to know comedian Jasmine Ruiz. The Bronx, NY native shares some of their favorite moments in stand-up comedy and lets us know how they always own the laughs.

Name: Jasmine Ruiz
Hometown: Bronx, NY/Brooklyn, NY
Instagram/Twitter/Facebook/Snapchat/Tik-Tok: @slaywithjas
Years in Comedy: I’ve been entertaining on social media for six years, I’ve been doing written comedy for two years, and I’ve been doing stand-up on and off for one year.
Haven’t we seen you somewhere before: You may have seen me on my viral series “Dr. G the Gangsta Therapist” or “A Bronx Girl Visits…” I also co-host The Rick H. Show and have been featured on several podcasts all linked on my website at the “featured on” section.
Comedic Influences: Steve Carell, Tina Fey, Seth Rogen, Kevin Hart, Dave Chappelle, Mindy Kaling, & Jerry Seinfeld
Favorite Comedy Album: Excuse me while I go find a comedy album to listen to…
Favorite Comedy Special: I have so many, but I have very fond memories watching Kevin Hart: Let Me Explain. I remember seeing it for the first time and laughing the whole way through!
Favorite Comedy Movie: Superbad…I have seen it too many times to count and I still laugh every time as if I’ve never seen it. Comedic gold!
Favorite Comedy TV Show: The Office
Favorite Comedic Character: My favorite cartoon character is Rick Sanchez from Rick and Morty. My favorite human character is Michael Scott…but I must say, Jack Donaghy always has me in tears.
Favorite City to Perform In: NYC…but it’s also the only city I’ve performed in… for now.
Favorite Topics to Joke About: Soft people.
Favorite Type of Audience for a Comedy Show: A savage NYC audience
Favorite Comedy Club: The Comedy Cellar

How did you discover your passion for comedy:
Growing up, everyone around me used comedy to cope with stress, pain, and hardship. People would laugh to keep from crying. I find this to be true for most comedians. I started making comedic videos in 2016 with daily commentary on everything and anything. I started a few daily segments on my IG stories – Cubicle Talk, Basic Bitch Coffee, Cart Coffee…I documented my days. Fast forward to 2020, the pandemic hit, I was depressed, so I did what I do best, I laughed it off. Only this time I had TikTok. It was the perfect platform for silly people like me and ever since then I’ve leaned into comedy and owned my identity as a comedian and writer.

What do you remember most about your first time performing stand-up comedy:
I first performed at Eastville Comedy Club during an open mic and I remember how supportive the other comedians were and how much the audience loved my set. Everyone laughed throughout and at the end I mentioned this was my very first time. Afterwards at the bar, I received so many words of encouragement and support from fellow comedians. Everyone knows how difficult it is to get up there and make a crowd of strangers laugh, so I really appreciated everyone who encouraged me.

How would you describe your comedic style:
In terms of standup, I focus on storytelling and my style is a mix of honest, crude, and a little raunchy. When it comes to online content, I’m more silly and ridiculous. I love to exaggerate truths and make fun of people, things, and situations that others can relate to.

Rick Fields

Describe your process for comedic writing:
My process starts with me reacting to something that happened in real life. I like to create comedy around intense emotions. If I’m ever feeling very strongly about something, I stop and think… how can I turn this into a skit, a joke, a standup routine? From there I word vomit on the page and allow my stream of consciousness to flow without editing until I’m done with my tangent. Afterwards, I edit out the non-jokes and add jokes where there is a funny idea, but not yet a punch line.

Describe the comedy scene in your area:
NYC is huge for comedy. If you know NYC, you know it’s booming.

How do you judge success in the world of comedy:
If I’m making people laugh, I consider that success. That’s where it all begins. You have to be good before the money can roll in.

Who are some of your comedic peers that you enjoy watching perform or inspire you personally and professionally:
Eva Evans, Cipha Sounds, Morgan Jay, Brandon Reeves, Adrien Carter, & Lauren LoGiudice, Glorelys Mora, Geo Perez, & Derek Drescher

What’s been your most memorable moment in comedy:
I’ve had so many laughs it’s hard to say! As a performer, my first time performing at Broadway Comedy Club was awesome. The crowd was alive! As a viewer, my first time at the Comedy Cellar left me in stitches. My face hurt from laughing so much.

Ness B.

What have you learned most from your failures in comedy:
I’ve learned that it takes serious skill to be able to joke about topics people identify with such as religion or politics. It’s difficult as a comedian to find the line between funny and offensive, especially in today’s world of cancel culture. The only way to find out is to fail. You don’t know what is too far until you say a joke that doesn’t land. A good comedian can joke about anything, but it takes a lot of experience to be a good comedian. In the meantime, those still honing their craft need the freedom to make mistakes without fear of their career ending before it begins.

How do people react towards you when they realize that you can make people laugh:
They usually perk up, smile, and say “cool!” I think the world needs more humor, and I appreciate being well received.

Describe what it’s been like building a career in stand-up comedy:
It’s so time consuming. I would say for every 5-minute set I’ve spent hours writing, practicing in the mirror, and watching my own videos of my performance. I take great care into everything I do and make sure that my words and performance qualities are very intentional. I would also say it’s a social career and part of building is meeting other comedians and attending comedy shows. Building a career takes courage and resilience. You have to be able to try, fail, and stay motivated.

If you could change one thing in the world of comedy, what would it be:
Since I already mentioned cancel culture, a practical thing I would get rid of is bringer shows where comedians must bring a certain number of people. I’d also make sure every comedian got paid for their set. I think the comedic world can be exploitative by turning comedians into promoters for their shows and not paying performers who put so much time and effort into their craft. It’s only fair that they pay the comedians who are the only reason people go to the shows.

Best advice you’ve ever received from a comedian:
Don’t put your full set on the internet, don’t be scared to demand what you’re worth, comedic timing is everything so practice it.

If you were releasing a comedy special this week, what would it be called:
“The Struggle Bus”… I’ve been on this bus for 29 years…but hey, at least I’m driving it now…

Funniest encounter you’ve ever had with a celebrity:
I haven’t had any funny encounters with celebrities yet… clearly I need to get out more…but in this economy!?

Weirdest place you’ve ever performed any form of comedy:
I had a daily segment I’d host on my IG stories called Cubicle Talk where I would have funny conversations with my coworkers in our cubes… If you’re my employer and you’re reading this, ignore me I’m lying.

A Jasmine Ruiz Fun Fact:
I like to make fun of soft people because growing up I was the softest person in my household and everyone made fun of me for being sensitive. I’m silly, nerdy, and sometimes dorky. I’m the anti-gangsta. I’m the “can’t do anything wrong because I’ll feel guilty about it and have diarrhea” type of person. I’m the “if you’re going to commit a crime don’t tell me because if I got interrogated, I’d piss my pants and cry” type of person.

Where would you like your laughs to take you:
Long term, I’d like to sell my dramedy and have it on Netflix or HBO. I also want to write on animated shows. More specifically, I’m working towards writing for Rick and Morty and Family Guy.

What would you tell a potential comedian if they ask you how they can own the laughs:
I would say be vulnerable. There’s something funny about someone genuinely getting some trauma off their chest.

What are your thoughts on the future of comedy:
I’m a little nervous for it with all the softies out there that think we need to coddle their feelings in a baby blanket and feed it some nice, warm, nutritious breast milk. Then again, I’m seeing more comedians produce their own specials for YouTube and that gives me hope that comedy will go on! It will be glorious! It will be offensive! It will make people laugh! And Cry! And do both at the same time!

Nessa B.

If you could write one episode for one classic TV sitcom which show would it be and give a brief detailed sentence on the episode:
I actually already wrote an episode of Family Guy. I used it to apply for a Warner Brothers program. “After Kendall Jenner’s viral cucumber moment, Peter tries and fails to go viral by pranking his family. Brian and Stewie go viral first forcing Peter to use his obesity to his advantage and become a fatfluencer.”

If you could choose 1 comedy club and 3 comedians to perform with on your perfect comedy show, how would it go:
I would choose the Comedy Cellar and I’d perform with Eva Evans, Cipha sounds, and Morgan Jay.

What’s next for you:
I’m working on quite a few avenues that all lead to my goals. I’m building my online presence because the more eyes on me, the more likely I am to be seen by someone who may reach out to me with an opportunity or find someone I’m interested in reaching out to. I’m attending events, comedy shows, and making podcast appearances to network and meet others in the industry. I’m taking improv classes to hone my craft. I’m continuing to create content with hopes of attracting a manager and agent. I’m reading books and watching MasterClasses that allow me to strengthen my screenwriting abilities. I’m not sure what is next exactly, but it’s only a matter of time before I make something happen.

Why should a person always laugh at life:
I’m working on quite a few avenues that all lead to my goals. I’m building my online presence because the more eyes on me, the more likely I am to be seen by someone who may reach out to me with an opportunity or find someone I’m interested in reaching out to. I’m attending events, comedy shows, and making podcast appearances to network and meet others in the industry. I’m taking improv classes to hone my craft. I’m continuing to create content with hopes of attracting a manager and agent. I’m reading books and watching MasterClasses that allow me to strengthen my screenwriting abilities. I’m not sure what is next exactly, but it’s only a matter of time before I make something happen.

Follow Jasmine Ruiz’s comedic journey on these social media websites:
Instagram/Twitter/Facebook/Snapchat/Tik-Tok: @slaywithjas
Youtube: Jasmine Ruiz